Intersectional Perspectives on Working in Higher Education – Diversity, Collegiality, Productivity and Technology

Work Futures Research Centre panel discussion, 2nd November 2016 The managerial university is characterized by norms and standards, in particular performance auditing, which disrupt those of the classic humanist university. At the same time it offers opportunities for underrepresented groups - women, ethnic minorities through initiatives such as Athena Swan and the Race Equality Charter. Continue reading →

Local work futures in Southampton and Hampshire

by Rebekah Luff, Suzanne Reimer, Silke Roth and Charlie Walker A key dimension of projects and events organised by the Work Futures Research Centre at the University of Southampton has been an ongoing engagement with different user groups in relation to employment change, seeking to shape policy and research agendas and to disseminate research findings. 2015, for example, saw the organisation of a policy dialogue event, Gender equality at work, held in June at Portcullis House, Westminster. Continue reading →

The search for the “Holy Grail” of Leadership

By Edgar Meyer Much is said about the challenges we face in today’s working environment. Globalisation, pervasive technology, environmental issues, and social challenges are all adding complexity to our working lives. In addition, in the recent past we have witnessed an increasing number of corporate scandals that perpetuate questions on the viability of the macro-economic ideals of free markets and capitalism. Continue reading →

Making a Difference – or Maintaining Global Inequalities? Perspectives on International Aid Work

Aid work – that is work for humanitarian and development agencies is attractive to men and women in all stages of life, after school or university, in mid-life or in retirement. Involvement in development and humanitarian relief promises meaningful and challenging work and provides opportunities for ‘making a difference’. Aid work encompasses a wide range of paid and unpaid work. Continue reading →